Pearson BTEC L5 Higher National Diploma in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering)

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering)

The purpose of BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and The Built Environment is to develop students as professional, self-reflecting individuals able to meet the demands of employers in the construction and the built environment sector and adapt to a constantly changing world.

The qualifications aim to widen access to higher education and enhance the career prospects of those who undertake them. The BTEC Higher National qualifications in Construction and The Built Environment are aimed at students wanting to continue their education through applied learning. Higher Nationals provide a wide-ranging study of the construction and the built environment sector and are designed for students who wish to pursue or advance their career in construction and the built environment. In addition to the knowledge, understanding and skills that underpin the study of the construction and the built environment sector, Pearson BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and The Built Environment give students experience of the breadth and depth of the sector that will prepare them for further study or training.

The objectives of the BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and The Built Environment are as follows:

● To equip students with construction and the built environment skills, knowledge and the understanding necessary to achieve high performance in the global construction and the built environment sector.

● To provide education and training for a range of careers in construction and the built environment, including civil engineering, building services engineering, quantity surveying, construction management, and architectural technology.

● To provide students with an understanding of the way technologies are transforming the industries of construction and the built environment, and prepare them to work with these technologies.

● To provide insight and understanding into diversity of roles with construction and the built environment, recognising the importance of collaboration at all levels.

● To equip students with knowledge and understanding of culturally diverse organisations, cross-cultural issues, diversity and values.

● To provide opportunities for students to enter or progress in employment in construction and the built environment, or progress to higher education qualifications; such as an Honours degree in Construction and The Built Environment or a related area.

● To provide opportunities for students to develop the skills, techniques and personal attributes essential for successful working lives.

● To support students to understand the local, regional and global context of construction and the built environment and, for those students with a global outlook, to aspire to international career pathways.

● To provide students with opportunities to address contemporary issues facing the industry, and society at large; with particular emphasis on sustainability and the environment, recognising the role that construction and the built environment plays in addressing these issues.

● To provide opportunities for students to achieve a nationally-recognised professional qualification within their chosen area of specialisation.

● To provide opportunities for students to achieve vendor accredited certifications.

● To offer students the chance of career progression in their chosen field, with particular emphasis on achieving management-level positions, professional recognition and beyond.

● To allow flexibility of study and to meet local or specialist needs.

● To offer a balance between employability skills and the knowledge essential for students with entrepreneurial, employment or academic aspirations.

● To provide students with opportunities to engage in an industry-recognised apprenticeship scheme that aligns with their employer’s needs and their own career aspirations.

● To provide students with the context in which to consider professional ethics and their relation to personal, professional and statutory responsibilities within the industry.

Course Outline

The course consists of 15 modules:

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering) Unit Unit Credit
1 Individual Project (Pearson-set) Core Unit Mandatory 15
2 Construction Technology Core Unit Mandatory 15
3 Science & Materials Core Unit Mandatory 15
4 Construction Practice & Management Core Unit Mandatory 15
6 Construction Information (Drawing, Detailing, Specification) Specialist Unit Mandatory 15
8 Mathematics for Construction Specialist Unit Mandatory 15
18 Civil Engineering Technology Optional Unit 15
20 Principles of Structural Design Specialist Unit Mandatory 15
22 Group Project (Pearson-set) Core Unit Mandatory 30
28 Further Mathematics for Construction Specialist Unit Mandatory 15
29 Geotechnics & Soil Mechanics Specialist Unit Mandatory 15
30 Advanced Structural Design Specialist Unit Mandatory 15
38 Personal Professional Development Optional Unit 15
43 Hydraulics Optional Unit 15
47 Construction Data Management Optional Unit 15


Unit and Unit Objectives:

1 Individual Project (Pearson-set)

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Formulate a project that will provide a solution to an identified problem.
  2. Manage a project within agreed timescales and specification; documenting the process throughout.
  3. Evaluate potential project management solutions.
  4. Produce a project report and deliver a presentation of the final project outcomes.

2 Construction Technology

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Explain the terminology used in construction technology.
  2. Describe the different techniques used to construct a range of substructures and superstructures, including their function and design selection criteria.
  3. Identify the different types of civil engineering/infrastructure technology used in support of buildings.
  4. Illustrate the supply and distribution of a range of building services and how they are accommodated within the building.

3 Science & Materials

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Review health and safety regulations and legislation associated with the storage, handling and use of materials on a construction site.
  2. Discuss the environmental and sustainability factors which can impact on and influence the material choices for a construction project.
  3. Present material choices for a given building using performance properties, experimental data, sustainability and environmental consideration.
  4. Evaluate the performance of a given building in respect of its human comfort requirements.

 4 Construction Practice & Management

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Describe the construction industry with reference to company structures and other activities.
  2. Explain different types of construction companies in the market and their relationships within the tendering process.
  3. Discuss the key stages in a construction project, and how Building Information Modelling informs the different stages.
  4. Analyse how the construction industry has developed suitable collaboration strategies in support of greater recognition of health & safety.

6 Construction Information (Drawing, Detailing, Specification)

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Evaluate different types of construction information in the context of diverse project types.
  2. Develop construction drawings, details, schedules and specifications in support of a given construction project.
  3. Interpret different types of construction information in order to explain a construction project.
  4. Assess ways in which construction professionals collaborate in the production of construction information.

8 Mathematics for Construction

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Identify the relevance of mathematical methods to a variety of conceptualised construction examples.
  2. Investigate applications of statistical techniques to interpret, organise and present data by using appropriate computer software packages.
  1. Use analytical and computational methods for solving problems by relating sinusoidal wave and vector functions to their respective construction applications.
  1. Illustrate the wide-ranging uses of calculus within different construction disciplines by solving problems of differential and integral calculus.

18 Civil Engineering Technology

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Explain the methods and techniques used in civil engineering for earthworks and substructures.
  1. Present a site safety plan, risk assessment and method statement for a given civil engineering activity.
  1. Evaluate a given civil engineering problem and propose a solution.
  2. Prepare a design proposal for a new infrastructure project.

20 Principles of Structural Design

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Calculate bending moments and shear forces for simply supported steel and concrete beams.
  2. Determine deflection for simply supported steel beams.
  3. Calculate the axial load carrying capacity of steel and reinforced concrete columns.
  4. Explore design methods for steel, reinforced concrete beams and columns.

 22 Group Project (Pearson-set)

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Assess individual and group skills in order to allocate roles within a collaborative team.
  2. Plan a construction project, based on the Pearson-set theme, in collaboration with others to ensure good practice in resource management, staffing and project scheduling.
  3. Prepare tender documentation; undertaking work appropriate to a defined role within a team.
  4. Evaluate own work, and the work of others, in a collaborative team.

 28 Further Mathematics for Construction

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Apply instances of number theory in practical construction situations.
  2. Solve systems of linear equations relevant to construction applications using matrix methods.
  3. Approximate solutions of contextualised examples with graphical and numerical methods.
  4. Review models of construction systems using ordinary differential equations.

 29 Geotechnics & Soil Mechanics

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Review rock types, their formation and uses within civil engineering.
  2. Explore and classify soils to current codes of practice.
  3. Analyse soil properties determined by geotechnical procedures.
  4. Produce a proposal to address identified geotechnical weaknesses and problems.

 30 Advanced Structural Design

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Explore deflection due to wind loadings, on fixed structures, and strategies to resist wind loading.
  2. Determine bending, shear and deflection for complex support conditions.
  3. Design complex columns and piled foundations based on calculation.
  4. Explore the design of tensile structures.

 38 Personal Professional Development

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Assess personal learning needs and opportunities within the context of employment.
  2. Plan and manage own personal learning journey, through consultation with employer and tutor/instructor.
  3. Record personal progress and the feedback of others; responding as appropriate to own future development.
  4. Evaluate own learning, based on personal experience and comments from others, in order to plan for the future.

 43 Hydraulics

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Apply concepts of physics to develop solutions for hydrostatic and hydrodynamic problems.
  2. Calculate forces related to fluids at rest and in motion.
  3. Develop practical solutions for the distribution of fluids within correctly sized pipes.
  4. Calculate the hydrostatic pressure exerted on substructures for a given context.

 47 Construction Data Management

 By the end of this unit students will be able to:

  1. Assess the importance of information management within the construction industry.
  2. Evaluate the role of information management and how it can benefit and support intelligent information exchanges.
  3. Illustrate the information delivery cycle, in regard to BIM, and how the information management process aids the design, construction and occupation of an asset.
  4. Discuss the ways in which information can be captured, shared and managed throughout a project lifecycle.

Scope of Study

The Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering) offers students 6 ‘specialist pathways’ designed to support progression into relevant occupational areas or on to degree-level study. These pathways are linked to Professional Body standards and vendor accredited certification (where appropriate) and can provide professional status and progression to direct
employment.

The Level 5 BTEC Higher National Diploma offers the following specialist pathways for students who wish to concentrate on a particular aspect of construction and the built environment:

● Construction – Management
● Construction – Architectural Technology
● Building Services Engineering – Electrical
● Building Services Engineering – Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning
● Civil Engineering
● Quantity Surveying

Holders of the Level 5 Higher National Diploma will have developed a sound understanding of the principles in their ‘specialist pathway’ of study and will have learned to apply those principles more widely. They will have learned to evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving problems. They will be able to perform effectively in their chosen field and will have the qualities necessary for employment in situations requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision-making.

Rules of Combination for:

Pearson BTEC level 4 Higher National Certificate in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering)

1) Qualification credit value: a minimum of 120 credits. This is made up of eight units, each with a value of 15 credits.
2) There is a required mix of core and optional units totalling 120 credits. All units are at Level 4.
3) In some cases a maximum of 30 credits can be imported from another RQF Pearson BTEC Higher National qualification and/or from units designed by the centre and approved by Pearson. Core units may not be substituted.

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering)

1) Qualification credit value: a minimum of 240 credits, of which 120 credits are at Level 5, and 120 credits are at Level 4 and usually attained via the HNC.

2) There is a required mix of core, specialist and optional units totalling 240 credits. The core units required for each Level 5 specialist pathway (in addition to the specialist units) are Construction Research Project, which is weighted at 30 credits, and Business Enterprise, weighted at 15 credits.

3) The requirements of the Higher National Certificate (or equivalent) have to be met. In some cases, a maximum of 60 credits can be imported from another RQF Pearson BTEC Higher National qualification and/or from units designed by the centre and approved by Pearson. Core units and specialist units may not be substituted.

Delivery Mode

The module will consist of lectures, case studies, role play, class exercises, games, tutorials and other appropriate learning methodologies to equip and to develop the students’ dynamic learning.

Commencement Dates / Intakes

To view dates of Intakes, please click here

Course Duration

The course duration is 20 months of Institutional study – Full-time
The maximum period allowable for the student to complete the course is 40 months.
The course duration is 24 months of Institutional study – Part-time
The maximum period allowable for the student to complete the course is 48 months.

Class Period

Full-Time
1 Session per day
3 contact hours per session
15 contact hours per week

Part-time
Weekdays (twice a week) – 7pm to 10pm, or
Weekend (only Sunday classes) – 10am to 4pm

Course Fees & Brochure

To view Full-time course fees, please click here.

To view Part-time course fees, please click here.

To view brochure, please click here.

Payment Mode

Click to view details on payment mode, please click here.

Click to view details on Fees Protection Scheme (FPS), please click here.

For further information or clarification, please call our Student Support Services Officer at +65 6336 3462.

Assessments

  • Coursework
  • Presentation

Assessment Methods

BTEC Higher Nationals in Construction and the Built Environment are assessed
using a combination of internally assessed, centre-devised internal assignments (which are set and marked by centres), and internally assessed, Pearson-set assignments (which are set by Pearson and marked by centres). Pearson-set assignments are mandatory and target particular industry-specific skills. The number and value of these units are dependent on qualification size:

● For the HND, two core units: one core, 15 credit, unit at Level 4 and one core, 30 credit, unit at Level 5, will be assessed by a mandatory Pearson-set assignment targeted at particular skills;

All other units in both qualifications are assessed by centre-devised internal assignments.

Pearson BTEC Level 5 HND is 100% assignment based. Assessment in this level is evidenced by the course work of the learners under the close supervision of the lecturer and/or tutor. Assignments and assessments are developed based on the rigors of the learning outcomes and criteria set for each and every unit.

Should a learner fail to meet the criteria for passing a unit or module at first attempt, a one-time chance will be given to resubmit an evidence of their assignment subject to the guidelines of resubmission. A redo of the whole unit shall take place if a learner fails to meet the assessment criteria at second attempt.

Each successfully completed unit will be graded as a pass, merit or distinction.

Resubmission opportunity

An assignment provides the final assessment for the relevant learning outcomes and is normally a final assessment decision. A student who, for the first assessment opportunity, has failed to achieve a Pass for that unit specification shall be expected to undertake a reassessment.

• Only one opportunity for reassessment of the unit will be permitted.
• Reassessment for course work, project- or portfolio-based assessments shall normally involve the reworking of the original task.
• For examinations, reassessment shall involve completion of a new task.
• A student who undertakes a reassessment will have their grade capped at a Pass for that unit.
• A student will not be entitled to be reassessed in any component of assessment for which a Pass grade or higher has already been awarded.

N. Repeat Units
A student who, for the first assessment opportunity and resubmission opportunity, still failed to achieve a Pass for that unit specification:
• At Centre discretion and Assessment Board, decisions can be made to permit a repeat of a unit.
• The student must study the unit again with full attendance and payment of the unit fee.
• The overall unit grade for a successfully completed repeat unit is capped at a Pass for that unit.
• Units can only be repeated once.

Assessment Grading Criteria

  • To achieve a Pass, a student must have satisfied all the Pass criteria for the learning outcomes, showing coverage of the unit content and therefore attainment at Level 4 of the national framework.
  • To achieve a Merit, a student must have satisfied all the Merit criteria (and therefore the Pass criteria) through high performance in each learning outcome.
  • To achieve a Distinction, a student must have satisfied all the Distinction criteria (and therefore the Pass and Merit criteria), and these define outstanding performance across the unit as a whole.

The award of a Pass is a defined level of performance and cannot be given solely on the basis of a student completing assignments. Students who do not satisfy the Pass criteria should be reported as Unclassified.

Expected Examination Results Release Date

Not more than 3 months from the date of Final Assessment.

Qualification Award

Pearson BTEC Level 5 Higher National Diploma in Construction and The Built Environment (Civil Engineering) – Awarded by Pearson Education Ltd

Graduation Requirements

To achieve a Pearson BTEC Higher National Diploma qualification a student must
have:
● Completed units equivalent to 120 credits at level 5;
● Achieved at least a pass in 105 credits at level 5;
● Completed units equivalent to 120 credits at level 4;
● Achieved at least a pass in 105 credits at level 4.

Teacher Qualifications

The Committee for Private Education (CPE) is duly notified of all the teachers by Coleman College. All teachers have the required qualifications and/or experience. Please refer to Our Teachers list in the website for more details.

Average Teacher-Student Ratio is 1:40 for Lectures.

Please note that the maximum number of students in the classroom is subjected to the allowable seating capacity

Progression Pathway

Graduate who wish to further their studies in this field may apply to a relevant programme/course offered by other institutions or universities. Admission is subject to meeting the institution or university minimum entry requirements at the point of application.

Age: At least 18 years old
Academic: BTEC Level 4 Higher National Certificate or ‘A’ Level 3 subjects passes in English plus any other subjects or; a related Diploma from local Polytechnic or CPE registered PEI or equivalent (Diplomas from other countries).
Work Experience: Without the above entry requirement, a student should be at least 30 years old with 8 years of working experience
English Proficiency: IELTS 5.5 or equivalent

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